Economy

Robots are doing more and more human jobs. We need a plan on how the majority of humans will survive when there is no work for them to do. How do we need to change our economy so that everyone benefits from the work robots are doing, not just the few that control all the robots. Should taxes be collected and the benefits shared with everyone? Think about the control the few companies that manage the robots will have. 

How worthless will we all feel, what will keep us entertained?

http://mentalfloss.com/article/58332/7-new-robots-designed-do-human-jobs

Bits of Cents — Disassembling the Dash

Bits of Cents — Disassembling the Dash

Disassembling the Dash On Thursday I got an email from Amazon saying I had been selected to try out two Dash buttons at zero cost. To be honest it as kind of surprising given that although we order from them plenty, I can’t say that we regularly stock up on consumables from Amazon: they suggested I get the Gillette razor button, something I’ve ordered twice. Maybe it’s a ploy to try and get me to order more regularly from them. Maybe it’s because I’m in New York and they are trying to get more density in Manhattan. Maybe they read my blog. Who knows but in any case it’s free hardware. The functionality is simple enough: click a button, get the Dash item at your door. But what makes it tick? Like any good hardware nerd, I was excited to find out.

More info at: Bits of Cents — Disassembling the Dash

KIM-1 – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

KIM-1 – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Remembering the good ole days. This was one of my first computers. I had to punch in the hex values into memory locations. It was the brains of my for Robot project. I was in high school back in about 1980.

The KIM-1 consisted of a single printed circuit board with all the components on one side. It included three main ICs; the MCS6502 CPU, and two MCS6530 Peripheral Interface/Memory Devices. Each MCS6530 comprises a mask programmable 1024 x 8 ROM, a 64 x 8 RAM, two 8 bit bi-directional ports, and a programmable interval timer.[3] The KIM-1 brochure said “1 K BYTE RAM” but it actually had 1152 bytes. The memory was composed of eight 6102 static RAMs(1024 x 1 bits) and the two 64 byte RAMs of the MCS6530s. In the 1970s memory sizes were expressed in several ways. Semiconductor manufacturers would use a precise memory size such as 2048 by 8 and sometimes state the number of bits (16384). Mini and mainframe computers had various memory widths (8 bits to over 36 bits) so manufacturers would use the term “words”, such as 4K words. The early hobbyist computer advertisements would use both “words” and “bytes”. It was common to see “4096 words”, “4K (4096) words” and “4 K bytes”. The term KB was unused or very uncommon. The KIM-1 was introduced in the April 1976 issue of Byte magazine and the advertisement stated “1 K BYTE RAM” and “2048 ROM BYTES”.[4]

More info at: KIM-1 – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Humanities story about how we created our robot overlords.