The Internet of Things – Nuts & Volts Magazine – For The Electronics Hobbyist

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The Internet of Things – Nuts & Volts Magazine – For The Electronics Hobbyist

NUTS & VOLTS MAGAZINE (NOVEMBER2014)

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THE INTERNET OF THINGS By Bryan Bergeron    View Digital Edition  

» Skip to the Extras Since the birth of the Internet, there has been talk of total connectivity — between people, people and their possessions, and things to things. Up until recently, the reality has been that such ecosystems existed only in academic and corporate research centers. Today, the Internet of Things (IoT) is a practical reality in many settings.

Read the original artical at: The Internet of Things – Nuts & Volts Magazine – For The Electronics Hobbyist

AI, Apple and Google — Benedict Evans

AI, Apple and Google — Benedict Evans

There are really two things going on here – you’re using voice to fill in a dialogue box for a query, and that dialogue box can run queries that might not have been possible before. Both of these are enabled by machine learning, but they’re built quite separately, and indeed the most interesting part is not the voice but the query. In fact, the important structural change behind being able to ask for ‘Pictures with dogs at the beach’ is not that the computer can find it but that the computer has worked out, itself, how to find it. You give it a million pictures labelled ‘this has a dog in it’ and a million labelled ‘this doesn’t have a dog’ and it works out how to work out what a dog looks like. Now, try that with ‘customers in this data set who were about to churn’, or ‘this network had a security breach’, or ‘stories that people read and shared a lot’. Then try it without labels (‘unsupervised’ rather than ‘supervised’ learning). 

Today you would spend hours or weeks in data analysis tools looking for the right criteria to find these, and you’d need people doing that work – sorting and resorting that Excel table and eyeballing for the weird result, metaphorically speaking, but with a million rows and a thousand columns.  Machine learning offers the promise that a lot of very large and very boring analyses of data can be automated – not just running the search, but working out what the search should be to find the result you want. 

More info at: AI, Apple and Google — Benedict Evans

‘We Hardly Understand Anything’: Rodney Brooks On Artificial Intelligence | Radio Boston

‘We Hardly Understand Anything’: Rodney Brooks On Artificial Intelligence | Radio Boston

If you’re going to talk about robots, there’s no better person to talk with than Rodney Brooks. He’s the former director of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. He’s also co-founder of two companies: iRobot, maker of the Roomba, and now Rethink Robotics.

He’s spent his entire life thinking about robots and artificial intelligence. He sat down with us to talk how he built his first machine, what technology we have yet to tackle and why Stephen Hawking and Elon Musk are wrong to fear the future of robots.

More info at: ‘We Hardly Understand Anything’: Rodney Brooks On Artificial Intelligence | Radio Boston

Robot Surgeons Are Taking Over the Operating Room – IEEE Spectrum

Robot Surgeons Are Taking Over the Operating Room – IEEE Spectrum

Advanced surgical robots are already helping doctors perform operations with previously unimaginable precision. But fairly soon, doctors may be able to hand the scalpel over entirely—at least for simple, repetitive procedures—freeing up human surgeons’ valuable time for more complex work.

Some of the latest surgical robots can already plan and execute simple surgical tasks entirely on their own, select optimal approaches and tools, and even use deep learning to observe and replicate new procedures. So we’ve rounded up a few of the coolest robo-surgeons just for you.

More info at: Robot Surgeons Are Taking Over the Operating Room – IEEE Spectrum

Researchers want robots to feel pain | The Verge

Researchers want robots to feel pain | The Verge

Researchers in Germany are developing a way for robots to feel pain, in the hopes that doing so will enable them to better protect humans. The researchers, from Leibniz University of Hannover, are working on an “artificial robot nervous system to teach robots how to feel pain,” IEEE Spectrum reports, and presented their project at a robotics and automation conference in Sweden last week. Under the system, robots would identify pain and quickly respond to avoid further damage to their parts.

More info at: Researchers want robots to feel pain | The Verge

Rethinking Knowledge in the Internet Age – Los Angeles Review of Books

Rethinking Knowledge in the Internet Age – Los Angeles Review of Books

The internet started out as the Information Highway, the Great Emancipator of knowledge, and as an assured tool for generating a well-informed citizenry. But, over the past 15 years, that optimism has given way to cynicism and fear — we have taught our children that the net is a swamp of lies spun by idiots and true believers, and, worse still, polluted by commercial entities whose sole aim is to have us click to the next ad-riddled page.

More info at: Rethinking Knowledge in the Internet Age – Los Angeles Review of Books

Economy

Robots are doing more and more human jobs. We need a plan on how the majority of humans will survive when there is no work for them to do. How do we need to change our economy so that everyone benefits from the work robots are doing, not just the few that control all the robots. Should taxes be collected and the benefits shared with everyone? Think about the control the few companies that manage the robots will have. 

How worthless will we all feel, what will keep us entertained?

http://mentalfloss.com/article/58332/7-new-robots-designed-do-human-jobs

Humanities story about how we created our robot overlords.